7 Most Dangerous Hazards in National Parks

While you are exploring the national parks this summer, don't leave common sense in the car. The parks are wild places with real hazards like flash floods, lightning strikes and heat-related illnesses. Keep you and your family safe with these life-saving tips.
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Lightning storm in the mountains above tree line

Lightning storms in the mountains can come in fast during the afternoons and are especially hazardous about the tree line.

Rocky Mountain National Park

Don't let Rocky Mountain's clear blue morning skies fool you. Every year, this natural hazard injures or kills visitors to the park. 

Zion National Park

Even Zion's driest, sandiest of spots can turn into raging rivers in a matter of seconds. Here's what you need to know to avoid being in a flash flood.

Olympic National Park

Without a map and a tide chart, your gorgeous day at the beach could turn life-threatening. Here’s what you need to know before you explore Olympic’s coastline.

Yosemite National Park

The park’s incredible waterfalls and the refreshing Merced River attract thousands of tourists, but these beloved sights take the lives of tourists every year. Find out how to stay safe.  

Grand Canyon National Park

You may feel great hiking down into the Grand Canyon, but suffering from heat stroke can be just steps away. Here are tips for avoiding and identifying silent, heat-related illnesses.

Great Smoky Mountains National Park

Water kills more people in Great Smoky than anything else, except motor vehicle accidents. Here's what you need to know about America's most visited national park.

Yellowstone National Park

Take advice from the park historian about the true threats to visitors.